Della Robbia at the MFA

Prudence Andrea della Robbia (Italian (Florentine), 1435–1525) Ca. 1475 Glazed terracotta *Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1921 (21.116) *Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Prudence, Andrea della Robbia, Ca. 1475
Lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1921 (21.116)
Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Hot summer days call for a retreat to the cool marbled halls of a museum. One of our favorite ways to spend a hot afternoon (or a snowy or rainy day for that matter!) is wandering the corridors of the MFA, stopping at the cafe for a little lunch and maybe a glass of wine, followed by a little more wandering and perhaps a browse through the gift shop. ;)

A current exhibition focuses on the glazed terracotta sculpture from the Della Robbia family. The particular glazing technique was invented in the 15th century by Luca della Robbia (1399/1400–1482), who later shared the secrets of the technique with nephew who passed it down to his sons. The style of sculpture is characterized by brilliant whites and deep blues. The exhibition of 50 objects is on view through December 4th. Find out more here.

Resurrection of Christ Ca. 1500-1520 Giovanni della Robbia (Italian, Florentine, 1469–1529/30) Italian, Renaissance Glazed terracotta *Brooklyn Museum, Gift of A. Augustus Healy 99.5 *Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Resurrection of Christ, Ca. 1500-1520, Giovanni della Robbia (Italian, Florentine, 1469–1529/30)
Brooklyn Museum, Gift of A. Augustus Healy 99.5, Courtesy, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

13_Saint-John-the-Baptist_Giovanni-Francesco-Rustici
Saint John the Baptist, Giovanni Francesco Rustici (Italian, Florentine, 1474–1554), About 1505–15
Gift of Mrs. Solomon R. Guggenheim, Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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